Author Topic: Jig colors  (Read 683 times)

losojos

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Jig colors
« on: Dec 29, 2003, 03:30 PM »
 ???  Is there any truth to the saying about lure colors?
"Bright colors on bright days,
Dark colors on dark days"
 :'(  Tight lines...  :)

Offline Fat Boy

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Re:Jig colors
« Reply #1 on: Dec 29, 2003, 04:47 PM »
It's a general rule, and I'd say that in general, it's true, but the issue I think is light penetration.  In open water, other factors could determine color selection, like water clarity, time of year, water temperature, forage base (match the hatch), and the habits species that you're after (aggression and mood) have.

In my mind, winter and ice fishing changes things (time of year and species that I'm after).  Generally, most of the lakes that I fish are crystal clear in the winter especially under ice.  Fish are generally picky about what they eat and presentation is very important.  Lure color can make a difference, but not as much as finding the fish and presenting the lure in an enticing manner.

With that in mind, you have to also determine as an ice angler what the fish is seeing down there.  The "rule" would tell us that on a sunny day we would use bright lures.  If there is no snow on the ice, dark lures could produce better if they match what the fish usually eats during the winter (panfish, trout, etc. eat insects and those colors are subdued).  On the other hand, if those don't work, often you can tease a fish to hit with something that just doesn't occur much in nature, like a hot orange glow jig.  And, if there is snow on the ice, even on a sunny day it's dark down there...my advice is to think like the critter you're after and start with that but adapt quickly when things don't happen (that is, if you know fish are there and won't hit, change colors, size, bait, presentation quickly).  Once you get a few fish on the same pattern, then you know that you can move to find aggressive fish when a hole dries up.

I've got a buddy that seems to have every color of every lure ever made for ice fishing.  He'll change colors all day long until he gets hits.  For me, I'd rather have a game plan based on various conditions around me and work from there, letting the fish tell me what they want.  For example, with panfish, I'll start with a decent size jig, maybe a size 10 chartreuse glow Genz worm with a couple maggots.  It's big and colorful, and all fish in the area can see it.  If they come over and check it out and hit, then I'll be on them all day most likely.  If they take a look and move away, it's time to change something.  Downsizing to me works better than changing color, but on a real sunny day with no snow on the ice and it's high noon, I'll not only downsize but go to a black or brown jig and only one maggot.

There is no absolute rule...use generalities as a guide but don't be afraid to adapt.  Let the fish tell you.
Kevin Wilson
http://fatboysoutdoors.blogspot.com/

Don't Leave Fish to Find Fish!


losojos

  • Guest
Re:Jig colors
« Reply #2 on: Dec 29, 2003, 06:08 PM »
THANKS F.B., - MUCH FOOD FOR THOUGHT  :'(
YOU MENTIONED LAKE FISHING AND CLEAR WATER - I USUALLY FISH IN THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER AND IT DOES CLEAR UP IN THE WINTER MONTHS BUT IT IS STILL SOMEWHAT MURKY...  :-\  I'LL JUST CHANGE SIZE AND COLORS UNTIL THE FISH TELL ME WHAT THEY WANT...   :'( :'(
THANKS AGAIN   :)
TIGHT LINES...

 



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