Author Topic: Wild edible foraging  (Read 821 times)

Offline WARRIOR_ON_ICE

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Wild edible foraging
« on: Jun 26, 2019, 09:38 PM »
I won't go into all the wild edibles that I forage for, just the new addiction. I harvested  50 pounds of ramps between April 24 and May 7 in 1 honey spot ! I made a ton of pesto, chip dip and just eating them raw, but also sold half to local restaurants at an average of $ 11 per pound. Chefs in the Hudson Valley are crazy about them. I pocketed $ 260 from selling to restaurants. Can't wait to do it again next year
The Ultimate Warrior is possessed with great power from the heavens above ! Against the mighty lake trout and pike and schools of crappie, the power of the WARRIOR will always ......... PREVAIL !!!

Offline grababrewski

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Re: Wild edible foraging
« Reply #1 on: Jun 26, 2019, 10:07 PM »
I know there's a bunch of "Stinky Pee Weed" (Asparagus) in the Denver metro area but I can't find it. The people that know where the patches are, are pretty tight lipped about it. I guess I'll keep looking......

Offline HWeber

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Re: Wild edible foraging
« Reply #2 on: Jun 26, 2019, 11:25 PM »
I know there's a bunch of "Stinky Pee Weed" (Asparagus) in the Denver metro area but I can't find it. The people that know where the patches are, are pretty tight lipped about it. I guess I'll keep looking......

In my area right now its a good time to find the patches as it's seeded out. Keep your eye out and remember spots for next year and you should be in luck then

Online DR.SPECKLER

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Re: Wild edible foraging
« Reply #3 on: Jun 27, 2019, 06:43 AM »
Ive got a huge patch of wild raspberries and blackberries that should start here soon.man in my drinking days id go fill a 5 gallon bucket up and make a ton of berry wine.now i go and get a few for jam,way tamer. Lol

Offline tomturkey

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Re: Wild edible foraging
« Reply #4 on: Jun 27, 2019, 07:42 AM »
it is not too hard to find wild asparagus once the fern starts to dry out by the color. The wild stuff should have better flavor than the  hybrid stuff you buy in the store. I used to eat a lot of asparagus as I come from a big asparagus growing area. Now that all of the commercial grown stuff is hybrid I do not each much as it does not have the flavor. My pee does not even stink.

If the stalks have berries it is not hybrid.

Offline Northern_MN Outdoorsan

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Re: Wild edible foraging
« Reply #5 on: Jun 27, 2019, 10:22 AM »
I won't go into all the wild edibles that I forage for, just the new addiction. I harvested  50 pounds of ramps between April 24 and May 7 in 1 honey spot ! I made a ton of pesto, chip dip and just eating them raw, but also sold half to local restaurants at an average of $ 11 per pound. Chefs in the Hudson Valley are crazy about them. I pocketed $ 260 from selling to restaurants. Can't wait to do it again next year

Be careful on overharvesting the ramps. They take up to 7 years to grow back in the areas you harvest after you pick them. Best thing to do is selective harvest and try to find different patches of them to rotate your harvests. Multiple patches should be easy to find in generally the same area that you found the patch you did that have the same soil and environment conditions.

Offline WARRIOR_ON_ICE

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Re: Wild edible foraging
« Reply #6 on: Jun 27, 2019, 04:40 PM »
Be careful on overharvesting the ramps. They take up to 7 years to grow back in the areas you harvest after you pick them. Best thing to do is selective harvest and try to find different patches of them to rotate your harvests. Multiple patches should be easy to find in generally the same area that you found the patch you did that have the same soil and environment conditions.

Yes I know there are a lot of articles on how slow they are to grow. I went a little overboard at this spot but didn't take more than half of them. The recommendation is to take something like 1/3 at most. It is the same exact spot that I harvest wineberries from every July. I make excellent jam from the wineberries. They are not the best bramble eaten raw, but the jam is terrific and it is easy to harvest 20 quarts in a day with a couple kids helping out.
The Ultimate Warrior is possessed with great power from the heavens above ! Against the mighty lake trout and pike and schools of crappie, the power of the WARRIOR will always ......... PREVAIL !!!

Offline Northern_MN Outdoorsan

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Re: Wild edible foraging
« Reply #7 on: Jun 28, 2019, 10:04 AM »
Yes I know there are a lot of articles on how slow they are to grow. I went a little overboard at this spot but didn't take more than half of them. The recommendation is to take something like 1/3 at most. It is the same exact spot that I harvest wineberries from every July. I make excellent jam from the wineberries. They are not the best bramble eaten raw, but the jam is terrific and it is easy to harvest 20 quarts in a day with a couple kids helping out.

Nice Warrior. I'm sure they'll be fine if you left more than half. Like I said in my earlier post you could always do a little searching around in the same general area and find other patches that you could harvest from as well. We get loads of them that grow around our cabin. Could fill an entire pickup bed heaping with them every year without even making hardly a dent with all the patches of them we've found over the years. Kind of neat to see some of the first green plants pop up right when our maple syrup season is ending. Those wine berries sound similar to chokecherries. They are bitter if eaten raw but they make great homemade jam and brandy. Happy foraging.

Offline perchnut

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Re: Wild edible foraging
« Reply #8 on: Jun 28, 2019, 02:07 PM »
Wine berries Rock!  They do make great jelly and are quite prolific.  Although, the berry brambles do seem to move around a bit....they will be really heavy for a while in one area, then seem to pick up and move 50 yards to another place.  They make an awesome crumble too.....Mix them and blueberries for a good paeleo desert....lots of recipes on the inter web. 

Online DR.SPECKLER

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Re: Wild edible foraging
« Reply #9 on: Jun 28, 2019, 02:51 PM »
Wine berries Rock!  They do make great jelly and are quite prolific.  Although, the berry brambles do seem to move around a bit....they will be really heavy for a while in one area, then seem to pick up and move 50 yards to another place.  They make an awesome crumble too.....Mix them and blueberries for a good paeleo desert....lots of recipes on the inter web.
yep ive notice the blackberry plants migrating too.they were everywhere at the first spot on my property but over the years they died off and moved about 60 yards from the original area.spreading out but the original spot is barren now.wonder why?i leave tons of berries for seeding..soil nutrients depleted maybe? Or nature of the plant.my wild raspberries stay in one spot.

Offline WARRIOR_ON_ICE

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Re: Wild edible foraging
« Reply #10 on: Jun 28, 2019, 07:11 PM »
Nice Warrior. I'm sure they'll be fine if you left more than half. Like I said in my earlier post you could always do a little searching around in the same general area and find other patches that you could harvest from as well. We get loads of them that grow around our cabin. Could fill an entire pickup bed heaping with them every year without even making hardly a dent with all the patches of them we've found over the years. Kind of neat to see some of the first green plants pop up right when our maple syrup season is ending. Those wine berries sound similar to chokecherries. They are bitter if eaten raw but they make great homemade jam and brandy. Happy foraging.

I'd love to discover a huge patch as you describe man ! I understand that MN is the farthest west that ramps have ever been found.  The best way to describe wineberries is that they are a red to magenta berry looking very similar to raspberry. The flavor of the raw berries is best described as not as tart or sweet or as intense as other brambles, they are just OK as a raw berry so making jam consumes the large majority of my harvest.

The wild edible that I wish NY had more of is something MN has plenty of - WALLEYE
The Ultimate Warrior is possessed with great power from the heavens above ! Against the mighty lake trout and pike and schools of crappie, the power of the WARRIOR will always ......... PREVAIL !!!

Offline SHaRPS

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Re: Wild edible foraging
« Reply #11 on: Jul 01, 2019, 10:31 AM »
Can anyone confirm or deny if this is the ostritch fern from these pictures? The fiddle head is the only thing I cannot find here in southern new england.
 


Just add water.

Offline FishGut

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Re: Wild edible foraging
« Reply #12 on: Jul 01, 2019, 07:44 PM »
Do you any of you guys see or pick cloudberries? My mom has been reminiscing.  Even a  handful would be a treasure these days.
Nebraska certified Fishing Instructor

Offline darkeyez

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Re: Wild edible foraging
« Reply #13 on: Jul 02, 2019, 12:50 PM »
A buddy of mine loves dogberry pie and knows where to forage for them, some people call them sour huckleberries.
They have to be one of the worse berries I ever tasted, unbelievably tart. I joked with him that for the next pie he should fill the crust up with butter and sugar and put 1 dogberry in the middle, then remove the dogberry so the pie is edible!  ::)

 



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