Author Topic: ITS ALMOST DILL PICKLE SEASON  (Read 798 times)

Offline Joe in T.C.

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ITS ALMOST DILL PICKLE SEASON
« on: Jul 05, 2018, 10:46 AM »
Well, ice fishing season is a ways off, so I thought I would share my dill pickle recipe with anyone that may like to try it.

This is a quick and easy recipe anyone can do. A friend entered it into his local fair and took 1st place!

                                  REFRIGERATOR DILL PICKLES     
                 
3 Pounds freshly picked, pickle quality cucumbers.
4 Cups white vinegar
4 Cups water
1/3 Cup coarse Kosher salt (no table salt)
1/4 Cup of white sugar
1 Tablespoon coriander seeds
2 teaspoons of whole black peppercorns
1-2 teaspoons of red pepper flakes (optional)
1/2 teaspoon “Pickle Crisp Granules” or food grade calcium chloride
3 Tablespoons of minced garlic
1 Medium sliced onion
1 large bunch of fresh dill

You don’t need any canning supplies for this project. I just use a one-gallon size zip lock bag and any glass containers that you have as long as they have lids.

Make your brine:

Add your water, vinegar, salt, and sugar to a pot, stir and bring it to a boil. Once it is boiling, turn it off, cover and let it cool down to room temperature. Once cooled to room temperature, stir in “Pickle Crisp Granules”.

Combine the cucumbers, brine and remaining ingredients:

Clean cucumbers and slice into spears or chips.
Put the dill, onions, garlic, coriander, peppercorns and red pepper flakes into the bottom of a one-gallon ziplock bag. Place the cucumbers on top of the other ingredients and then add the room temperature brine.
Squeeze out as much air as possible and zip seal.
Place the bag of brined cucumbers in a large bowl and then into the refrigerator. Flip bag over every 12 hours for about 4 days. Transfer to glass jars, making sure the pickles are covered with brine.
They can last six months or more in your refrigerator. Of course, ours always get eaten well before that.  :)

If you prefer, the whole pickling process can be done in a large glass jar in the refrigerator with no zip-lock bags. Just give it a stir with a wooden spoon from time to time.

This recipe also works great with Onions, Peppers, Green Tomatoes, or any other firm vegetable.
I have even heard of pickling watermelon and pumpkin rinds, but haven’t tried it.

What to look for in freshly picked cucumbers:

You want freshly picked dark green cucumbers with lots of bumps and deep ridges.
The more the seeds develop the more the skin becomes smooth.
Avoid the smooth, shiny, or plump cucumbers. You want the wrinkled ones with lots of warts.
Freshly picked cucumbers tend to snap, not bend.

What to look for in freshly picked dill:

Freshly picked dill should be mostly green with a mix of flowers and green seeds.
Dill with lots of brown seeds or stems can be bitter.
”Mammoth” or “Bouquet” dill is an excellent choice.
“Lace” or “Fern” dill is typically used for sauces, cooking, and cheese.
That being said, Lace dill can be used for dill pickles and some prefer it.

 




Enjoy!  :tipup:


Offline esox_xtm

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Re: ITS ALMOST DILL PICKLE SEASON
« Reply #1 on: Aug 06, 2018, 07:35 AM »
Thanks for reminding me Joe!  :thumbsup: :clap:

My cousin's husband makes some canned dills that are spectacularly flavorful and crispy. I've been meaning to pester him for the procedure but I must be gettin' old because I keep forgetting until the prime cuke season is long past.

Refrigerator pickles are awesomely easy. I've used my grandmothers recipe for ages but it's more of a bread n butter or sweet/sour type. Still very good. I keep a gallon jug of the fresh pickling juice in the spare fridge so I can whip up a batch anytime I feel like it. Wash, slice, pour, refrigerate... EZPZ.
Not fish? Not an option!




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