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Author Topic: Yellow perch  (Read 2667 times)

Offline mkeller

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Yellow perch
« on: Jan 23, 2018, 05:21 PM »
Why doesn't nebraska stock or have yellow perch in more areas of the state besides the valentine area?

Offline whitetips

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #1 on: Jan 23, 2018, 05:38 PM »
Why doesn't nebraska stock or have yellow perch in more areas of the state besides the valentine area?

The answer to that question is easy--because more areas of the state do not have yellow perch habitat!

Yellow perch are a coolwater fish that need relatively clear water and at least some aquatic vegetation or terrestrial vegetation on which to spawn.  Research has shown that coolwater species like walleye and especially yellow perch need a certain amount of cold during the winter to all proper development of eggs and milt.  Unfortunately, as you go south and east in Nebraska there are less and less bodies of water that can support populations of yellow perch.  Believe me, we have tried stocking yellow perch in a lot of places and in some of those there still may be a rare yellow perch, but nothing like the populations that some of our northern and western habitats can support.

 Nebraska is certainly a state where "east" meets "west" and "north" meets "south", our state has a great diversity of geography and climate, so that means we have a diversity of fish and wildlife, but unfortunately it also means we cannot have everything, everywhere.

http://magazine.outdoornebraska.gov/2016/01/yellow-perch/

Daryl B.
Daryl Bauer
Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
daryl.bauer@nebraska.gov
http://neblandvm.outdoornebraska.gov/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

Offline mkeller

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #2 on: Jan 23, 2018, 06:36 PM »
Thanks for answering my question.  Unfortunately makes good sense.  Would love to be able to chase them more than once or twice a year in south Dakota.

Offline Unclegillhunter

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #3 on: Jan 24, 2018, 03:31 AM »
Thanks for answering my question.  Unfortunately makes good sense.  Would love to be able to chase them more than once or twice a year in south Dakota.
So would we all!
Keep it safe! JDL

Offline Sandbilly

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #4 on: Jan 24, 2018, 07:44 AM »
Why doesn't nebraska stock or have yellow perch in more areas of the state besides the valentine area?

 ???  ??? I'm guessing around 2/3's of the lakes in the western half of the state have a viable perch population. A little research, travel time and a few folks that are willing to cut ice can have a gold payday out here.  ;)


Offline fishnfinn

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #5 on: Jan 24, 2018, 06:52 PM »
I understand this topic comes up every year, and I'm not a biologist. I have fished private waters in lancaster county that have nice yellow perch and they are taking over, no problem reproducing. Also Burchard has a population of yellow perch that has been there for a lot of years. I don't understand why for example a lake like wannahoo or similar lake with decent depth can't support the species.

Offline randall3

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #6 on: Jan 24, 2018, 08:53 PM »
I understand this topic comes up every year, and I'm not a biologist. I have fished private waters in lancaster county that have nice yellow perch and they are taking over, no problem reproducing. Also Burchard has a population of yellow perch that has been there for a lot of years. I don't understand why for example a lake like wannahoo or similar lake with decent depth can't support the species.

i was also wondering that considering beaver lake has perch. nice ones at that. and they also have a 12" minimum on harvest on top of thr private lake aspect that helps keep them in there. there used to be a few lakes around omaha that had tons of perch in them according to my gf dad. but he said they didnt last long after stocking due to people pulling piles out at a time. would be nice to have them but of they do put them in they would need to put a minimum length and keep people from harvesting them until the population takes hold

Offline whitetips

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #7 on: Jan 24, 2018, 09:39 PM »
I understand this topic comes up every year, and I'm not a biologist. I have fished private waters in lancaster county that have nice yellow perch and they are taking over, no problem reproducing. Also Burchard has a population of yellow perch that has been there for a lot of years. I don't understand why for example a lake like wannahoo or similar lake with decent depth can't support the species.

Sure, I know of some of those private waters too.  Way different habitat, way different fishing pressure and harvest.

Yep, a few perch in Burchard, has been for years.  And Burchard with its clean water and abundance of aquatic vegetation is probably about as close to yellow perch habitat as you can get in southeast Nebraska.  And a few yellow perch is about all it has ever had.

A new reservoir like Wanahoo might support some yellow perch for a few years, but as it ages the habitat will change and the perch will fade.  And how many perch do you suppose would be in there with all the pressure it has?  Come to think of it, suppose we could have any more anglers there than what we have now?

Daryl B.

Daryl Bauer
Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
daryl.bauer@nebraska.gov
http://neblandvm.outdoornebraska.gov/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

Offline randall3

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #8 on: Jan 25, 2018, 10:36 AM »
wanahoo does have a ton of pressure. what are the odds that this new flanagan lake will take some of the pressure off? havent seen much size increase in prarie queen. the new lake and prarie queen were supposed to be designed after wanahoo correct? just wondering if opening the lake to fishing right away is going to stunt the growth whereas wanahoo was closed to let the lake get a good foundation

Offline Mooncat

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #9 on: Jan 25, 2018, 10:49 AM »
Sure, I know of some of those private waters too.  Way different habitat, way different fishing pressure and harvest.

Yep, a few perch in Burchard, has been for years.  And Burchard with its clean water and abundance of aquatic vegetation is probably about as close to yellow perch habitat as you can get in southeast Nebraska.  And a few yellow perch is about all it has ever had.

A new reservoir like Wanahoo might support some yellow perch for a few years, but as it ages the habitat will change and the perch will fade.  And how many perch do you suppose would be in there with all the pressure it has?  Come to think of it, suppose we could have any more anglers there than what we have now?

Daryl B.

Daryl,

Wondering what your thoughts on Duck Creek down in Nemaha County and how Ice Fishing will be in the next few years, and also what kind of fish are in there and all that?

Thanks
Thanks,
Paul in Palmyra, Nebraska

Offline whitetips

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #10 on: Jan 25, 2018, 02:43 PM »
Daryl,

Wondering what your thoughts on Duck Creek down in Nemaha County and how Ice Fishing will be in the next few years, and also what kind of fish are in there and all that?

Thanks

Fish have been stocked in Duck Creek already, largemouth bass, bluegill, channel catfish and crappie.  Give it a couple years, and assuming there is safe ice, GO FISH!

Daryl B.
Daryl Bauer
Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
daryl.bauer@nebraska.gov
http://neblandvm.outdoornebraska.gov/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

Offline eyecrosser65

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #11 on: Jan 25, 2018, 11:49 PM »
Sure, I know of some of those private waters too.  Way different habitat, way different fishing pressure and harvest.

Yep, a few perch in Burchard, has been for years.  And Burchard with its clean water and abundance of aquatic vegetation is probably about as close to yellow perch habitat as you can get in southeast Nebraska.  And a few yellow perch is about all it has ever had.

A new reservoir like Wanahoo might support some yellow perch for a few years, but as it ages the habitat will change and the perch will fade.  And how many perch do you suppose would be in there with all the pressure it has?  Come to think of it, suppose we could have any more anglers there than what we have now?

Daryl B.
 I'm wondering what the purpose was of putting Northern Pike into Wanahoo was; as they are a cold water species also; like the Yellow Perch? Predator fish such as Largemouth Bass, Walleye and catfish would be enough to keep the panfish  population in check there along with angling pressure. And, speaking of angling pressure; isn't it a good thing  for Nebraska Fish and Game to see so many anglers fishing on a lake; they buy licenses, they buy park permits and all of this means revenue for the state and the department. Some of which can be used in hatcheries and stocking programs to keep this fishery going strong;  and aid in bringing others along as well. Almost sounds as if your answer was saying anglers are part of the problem rather than part of the solution? Not trying to pick a fight, just wondering what you are suggesting with this comment? It is a public access water, any resident/nonresident with a license is welcome to fish it; and can't limit the number of anglers each day with a quota system on lakes like this with a 1st come/1st serve sign in as the state would lose revenue with anglers being turned away and losing interest; which is the reverse of what anyone wants; as I believe it's important to bring new people, kids, etc. into the ranks to make we as sportsman a stronger voice. So what's the answer?
 

Offline mkeller

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #12 on: Jan 26, 2018, 06:07 AM »
Only fish in the southeast part of nebraska sandbilly.  I tried czechland lake last trip and I told my son would love to see yellow perch in here.  Reminded us of places we fish in south Dakota.

Offline whitetips

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #13 on: Jan 26, 2018, 03:51 PM »
Quote
I'm wondering what the purpose was of putting Northern Pike into Wanahoo was; as they are a cold water species also; like the Yellow Perch? Predator fish such as Largemouth Bass, Walleye and catfish would be enough to keep the panfish  population in check there along with angling pressure. And, speaking of angling pressure; isn't it a good thing  for Nebraska Fish and Game to see so many anglers fishing on a lake; they buy licenses, they buy park permits and all of this means revenue for the state and the department. Some of which can be used in hatcheries and stocking programs to keep this fishery going strong;  and aid in bringing others along as well. Almost sounds as if your answer was saying anglers are part of the problem rather than part of the solution? Not trying to pick a fight, just wondering what you are suggesting with this comment? It is a public access water, any resident/nonresident with a license is welcome to fish it; and can't limit the number of anglers each day with a quota system on lakes like this with a 1st come/1st serve sign in as the state would lose revenue with anglers being turned away and losing interest; which is the reverse of what anyone wants; as I believe it's important to bring new people, kids, etc. into the ranks to make we as sportsman a stronger voice. So what's the answer?
 

I have said why we have pike in Wanahoo dozens of times--it is a new reservoir and in that new reservoir habitat can support pike for a few years.  Since there are darned few opportunities for anglers to catch pike in southeast Nebraska we are taking advantage of that opportunity.  How long will it last?  Reservoirs age and when they do the habitat changes, sometime down the road Wanahoo likely will not support northern pike like it does now.  They are called "northern" pike for a reason, and even last summer there was some mortality of large pike observed.

To "ride" that pike fishing for as long as possible, they are protected with a total catch & release regulation.  A regulation that anglers were strongly in favor of.

Yep, anglers are their own worst enemies.  Suppose we could establish a yellow perch fishery with a total catch & release regulation?  We have seen perch fisheries literally in the middle of nowhere decimated in a matter of weeks.  Yep, we want people fishing, you bet.  I also want anglers to understand how valuable those fisheries resources are, and in many cases it is not simply a matter of stocking more fish.

So that is exactly the point--a new reservoir like Wanahoo can produce bluegills and crappies to withstand the incredible pressure it has received, but it would not produce and maintain that many yellow perch. 

Daryl B.
Daryl Bauer
Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
daryl.bauer@nebraska.gov
http://neblandvm.outdoornebraska.gov/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

Offline randall3

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #14 on: Jan 26, 2018, 05:22 PM »
i saw dozens of nice pike that were killed at wanahoo this summer. i believe it has a lot to do with how people handle them after they catch them, as well as bass fisherman cutting their gills because the pike break off their lures and it makes them mad. i witnessed numerous catches in other boats that kept the pike out of the water and let it flop on the deck amd took pics, only to release it with it barely kicking, most likely dying right after.
 maybe some signs showing how to handle a pike to keep it alive after release and let people know that pike cannot handle the abuse like a bass or crappie can. and about the gill cutting thing, i didnt see it personally but heard from multiple people who did witness it. if i was a game warden i would be sitting in the north channel marsh during bass tournies writing tickets

Offline eyecrosser65

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #15 on: Jan 27, 2018, 01:38 AM »
Thanks Daryl; just wondered about the Northern Pike as I hadn't read about the reason for the stocking as opportunistic in the past; fun fish to catch for sure and have no problem with their catch and release. I also agree the way word seems to travel about good fishing; Yellow Perch in that area; if stocked would be decimated in a few short years without very strict harvest regulations protecting them almost to the point it wouldn't be worth chasing them, as they are primarily a food fish as opposed to a trophy someone chases for its size. Thanks.

Offline eyecrosser65

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #16 on: Jan 27, 2018, 01:46 AM »
randall3; I believe that is covered in the Wanton waste law if I remember correctly; why would anyone want to cut their gills; just the price of fishing where there are pike present. For those who don't know I have some experience catching and releasing pike from growing up in the northeast. When you land them, never put your fingers in their eye sockets as I have seen some anglers do. Also, don't gill them and hold them straight up and down with their body weight pressuring the point where you have them gilled. Always hold them horizontal and support their body weight with one hand under their stomach area. They are a great fish in their own right and fun to catch I think. I've had them break me off more times than I can count and I'd never consider harming them intentionally before releasing them.

Offline randall3

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #17 on: Jan 27, 2018, 07:58 AM »
randall3; I believe that is covered in the Wanton waste law if I remember correctly; why would anyone want to cut their gills; just the price of fishing where there are pike present. For those who don't know I have some experience catching and releasing pike from growing up in the northeast. When you land them, never put your fingers in their eye sockets as I have seen some anglers do. Also, don't gill them and hold them straight up and down with their body weight pressuring the point where you have them gilled. Always hold them horizontal and support their body weight with one hand under their stomach area. They are a great fish in their own right and fun to catch I think. I've had them break me off more times than I can count and I'd never consider harming them intentionally before releasing them.


they cut there gills amd slice the throats of them cuz they get mad they lost a lure. its childish and inhumane. and yes i agree with how to hold them. im sayin maybe a poster at the boat launch or something to explain to the guys who play with the fish out of water for five minutes then just chuck it back in.

Offline drillinforgold

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #18 on: Jan 27, 2018, 10:25 AM »
This one would be for our resident biologist. I have lived on a small private reservoir 20 mi from Omaha for 18 yrs. When we moved here in 2000, we had a small population of large northerns up to 40". To my knowledge, they have been completely decimated by ignorance of bass anglers and knowledge of how to release them, and also your explanation of the lack of proper habitat. 2 yrs ago they decided to stock 12" tiger muskies, on a catch and release basis, to help eliminate our yellow bass problem. My question is, will we have any more success with them in a complete mud bottom lake, although up to 30' deep, than we did with Northerns?       

Offline eyecrosser65

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #19 on: Jan 27, 2018, 12:25 PM »
At randall3; have to agree with these anglers being childish and inhumane; no need for that no matter the lures you lose; cost of doing business where pike are present. Also, I agree there should be a poster posted as a reminder to anglers to release fish in an expedient manner and not just with pike; if you're going to let it go keep it boat side in a net or by lipping it (if not a pike or walleye) take your photo(s) when ready and release the fish unharmed.

Offline randall3

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #20 on: Jan 27, 2018, 06:48 PM »
At randall3; have to agree with these anglers being childish and inhumane; no need for that no matter the lures you lose; cost of doing business where pike are present. Also, I agree there should be a poster posted as a reminder to anglers to release fish in an expedient manner and not just with pike; if you're going to let it go keep it boat side in a net or by lipping it (if not a pike or walleye) take your photo(s) when ready and release the fish unharmed.


AGREED!!!

Offline whitetips

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #21 on: Jan 29, 2018, 11:37 AM »
This one would be for our resident biologist. I have lived on a small private reservoir 20 mi from Omaha for 18 yrs. When we moved here in 2000, we had a small population of large northerns up to 40". To my knowledge, they have been completely decimated by ignorance of bass anglers and knowledge of how to release them, and also your explanation of the lack of proper habitat. 2 yrs ago they decided to stock 12" tiger muskies, on a catch and release basis, to help eliminate our yellow bass problem. My question is, will we have any more success with them in a complete mud bottom lake, although up to 30' deep, than we did with Northerns?     

Maybe, but tiger muskies are still a cool-water species.  They will eat yellow bass, sure, but probably will not enough of them to make a noticeable difference.

Actually, pure-bred muskellunge, still a cool-water species, but are more tolerant of warm water than either northern pike or tiger muskies.

Daryl B.
Daryl Bauer
Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
daryl.bauer@nebraska.gov
http://neblandvm.outdoornebraska.gov/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

Offline drillinforgold

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #22 on: Jan 29, 2018, 05:41 PM »
Thanks, unless they teach the tiger muskies to ONLY eat yellow bass, they're just gonna eat. Our homeowners association needs to do more research rather than just throwing fish in the lake!!

Offline iceman 1960

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #23 on: Feb 05, 2018, 06:58 PM »
Hi
I was just wondering why the game & parks don't stock yellow perch in the middle lake at Bridgeport State Park?
If the lake can be stocked with trout every year, don't you think perch would do well there also?
It has clear water, good depth up to 30 feet deep in places and is a cold water lake !!
That's every thing that Daryl said they need. It already has a good bluegill population in the lake and I just think it's  a over looked lake for the fishermen in the panhandle.


Just my own opinion and I believe our game & parks are doing the best they can.😳

Offline whitetips

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Re: Yellow perch
« Reply #24 on: Feb 07, 2018, 04:54 PM »
Hi
I was just wondering why the game & parks don't stock yellow perch in the middle lake at Bridgeport State Park?
If the lake can be stocked with trout every year, don't you think perch would do well there also?
It has clear water, good depth up to 30 feet deep in places and is a cold water lake !!
That's every thing that Daryl said they need. It already has a good bluegill population in the lake and I just think it's  a over looked lake for the fishermen in the panhandle.


Just my own opinion and I believe our game & parks are doing the best they can.😳

It ain't just the depth, and the trout do not necessarily live there year around.  Sure, we stock the trout because they are easy to catch, especially in cold water, and are in those urban and parks waters so we can get some new anglers, kids, hooked on fishing (pun intended).  Are we, can we, accomplish the same thing with yellow perch?

We have stocked yellow perch in sandpits, just recently completed a research project evaluating that, again.  Yep, some sandpits can support yellow perch, especially if they have an abundance of aquatic vegetation, but then again they can have a lot more bluegills, especially in the presence of largemouth bass.  Those species just plain do better in those habitats.

It ain't just a matter of stocking fish.  Is it a better idea to keep stocking a panfish like yellow perch just to have a marginal fishery in a marginal habitat?  Or is it better to manage for species that actually are well-adapted to the habitat, can survive, and even maintain their population without continual stocking?  Could we support more pounds of bluegills or more pounds of yellow perch?  Especially in the face of bass predation?  Especially in the face of human predation?

I have said, again and again, we ain't against yellow perch.  Lord knows if we could snap our fingers have yellow perch for all, we would.  We are against doing the same things over and over and expecting different results.

Daryl B.

Daryl Bauer
Fisheries Outreach Program Manager
Nebraska Game & Parks Commission
daryl.bauer@nebraska.gov
http://neblandvm.outdoornebraska.gov/category/barbs-and-backlashes/

 



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