Author Topic: Setting the hook using circle/octopus hooks?  (Read 5352 times)

Offline WVBoy

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Setting the hook using circle/octopus hooks?
« on: Jan 12, 2004, 10:52 AM »
Was wondering if there is a certain technique for setting the hook using these circle hooks or octopus hooks on tipups for northern? I read somewhere that there is a different technique for setting these style hooks but they didnt say what technique it was?
"Men and fish are alike. They both get into trouble when they open their mouths." - Jimmy D Moore

grumpymoe

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Re:Setting the hook using circle/octopus hooks?
« Reply #1 on: Jan 12, 2004, 11:20 AM »
NO HOOK SET  when you feel the tension of the fish on the line, start reeling. thats the beauty of this old hook design. lol grumpymoe

Offline jp

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Re:Setting the hook using circle/octopus hooks?
« Reply #2 on: Jan 13, 2004, 05:10 AM »
I wait for him to run then i just slowly put on the brakes.

Offline WVBoy

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Re:Setting the hook using circle/octopus hooks?
« Reply #3 on: Jan 15, 2004, 11:54 AM »
What is the reasoning for not really setting the hook using this style hook?
"Men and fish are alike. They both get into trouble when they open their mouths." - Jimmy D Moore

Offline Muskie Matt

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Re:Setting the hook using circle/octopus hooks?
« Reply #4 on: Jan 15, 2004, 03:04 PM »
**Vin Sparano is the Editor Emeritus of Outdoor Life

It is ironical that the circle hook, developed for commercial longline fishermen because of its deadly hooking ability, would also become one the of the most innovative and effective catch-and-release devices to come along in decades.

What makes this awkward-looking hook so effective for longliners is the fact that fish will hook themselves, an important factor for longliners who leave their baited gear unattended.

Circle hooks have been around since the turn of the century and commercial fishermen have been using them for more than 20 years, but only recently have recreational anglers discovered the unique catch-and-release advantage of these peculiar looking hooks. Circle hooks will invariably hook fish in the corner of the mouth, making it much easier to release a fish with minimal handling and unharmed.

There is also mounting evidence that the circle hook lives up to its reputation. Spud Woodward, a marine biologist with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, has caught several hundred red drum up to 45 pounds. "More than 95 percent of these fish were hooked in the corner or the jaw," says Woodward. "Since we tag fish as part of our ongoing research, the circle hook helps us release a healthy fish back into the wild."

Al Ristori, a well-known saltwater angler and writer, reported a one-day catch of 25 striped bass on circle hooks with all but one bass hooked in the jaw. I used circle hooks this summer on bottom species and 90 percent of my fish were jaw hooked. In view of this growing evidence, some states are even considering making the circle hook mandatory for certain species to reduce mortality of undersize fish.

Studies also indicate that circle hooks are more effective than typical hook designs, which means you will catch more fish. One Canadian longliner reported the results of his comparison tests to the Fisheries Development Branch of Nova Scotia. Longlines were baited with an equal number of traditional and circle hooks. Of the 3,706 sets of each design fished over a period of eight days, the circle hooks took 794 halibut compared with 450 fish on traditional hooks.

What makes the circle hook different? First, and this is important, donıt try to set a circle hook when a fish hits. In fact, donıt try to set the hook at all. Let the fish chew on your bait until the hook does its job. One manufacturer, Eagle Claw, stresses this message with a label on its circle hook packages "On the take, do NOT set the hook; just reel fish in."

Hereıs how the circle hook works. A fish will take the bait into its mouth and start to swim off. At this point, if your try to set the hook, you will probably yank it right out of the fishıs mouth because of the hookıs design. Let the fish run and allow your line to tighten. When the line becomes taut, the eye of the hook will actually clear the mouth, but when the fish continues to swim away the hook will rotate in the fishıs mouth and the fish will hook itself in the corner of the jaw.

To overcome the urge to set the circle hook, try fishing "deadstick", which means leaving your baited rod in a holder and not touching it until its time to reel the fish in. When the fish is landed, a simple twist with a needle nose pliers on the shank will free the hook or you can use a dehooking device. Releasing small fish over water means you will not even have to touch the fish with your hands.

The circle hook should prove most effective for most bait fishing situations, especially livelining big shiners for largemouth or herring for striped bass. Catfishermen may also find the deadstick technique productive with stinkbaits.

Several manufacturers, including Eagle Claw and Mustad, now make circle hooks in sizes ranging from 1 to 8 for most freshwater bait fishing and 2/0 to 16/0 for saltwater species. There is some variation among manufacturers, so your best bet is to visit a tackle shop and compare actual sizes.

There is an additional advantage to using circle hooks. Because the point of a circle hook makes nearly a circle, a clumsy or careless fisherman is less likely to accidentally sink such a hook into his finger, ear or clothing.


**Vin Sparano is the Editor Emeritus of Outdoor Life Magazine, and is on the board of directors for The Catch & Release Foundation.

grumpymoe

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Re:Setting the hook using circle/octopus hooks?
« Reply #5 on: Jan 15, 2004, 03:43 PM »
muskiematt  awesome post!!! if anyone has questions reqarding the circle hook, they'll be referred here. grumpymoe 8)

Offline TroutFishingBear

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Re:Setting the hook using circle/octopus hooks?
« Reply #6 on: Jan 17, 2004, 07:29 PM »
I dislike circle hooks, they suck compared to regular trebles on a quick strike rig for pike
if anybody from michigan will help me out with the lakes and stuff up here I'd really appreciate it since I'm new to the area.

Offline Tom_K_from_NJ

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Re:Setting the hook using circle/octopus hooks?
« Reply #7 on: Jan 18, 2004, 09:40 AM »
What size circle hooks do you use for Pike, say from 25"-40" long?  I've been using trebles and normally set the hook on the 2nd run.  I use quick strike rigs with large (6"+) shinners.  With circles, do you wait for the 2nd run,or try to hook em on the 1st?  With tip ups and trebles, I normally hook my shinners in the back, especially as they seem to stay lively forever.   I find it a bit harder to hook my baits with circles, due to the curved-in point.
thanks in advance for any tips.  tom.

Offline WVBoy

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Re:Setting the hook using circle/octopus hooks?
« Reply #8 on: Jan 18, 2004, 09:58 AM »
Excellent article Musky Mat!! Thanks so much.By the sounds of it, circle hooks are the way to go especially for releasing fish which I do mostly anyway. I really have never been too concerned for losing or missing fish while fishing.As for Tom k, I am going with a 5/0 or 4/0. Looks large and it may affect your baits livelinness.I have used this size in a single hook on tipups and it works awesome. Rarely loose a fish.
"Men and fish are alike. They both get into trouble when they open their mouths." - Jimmy D Moore

 



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