Author Topic: Using a thermometer to locate likely spots  (Read 312 times)

Offline badger132

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Using a thermometer to locate likely spots
« on: Jan 28, 2019, 10:14 PM »
I have heard that temperature is important to fish, and to perch in particular, but I can't get an idea of what to look for. I bought a depth/thermometer, and will start probing as I fish, but has anyone used a thermometer to look for warm/cold spots, or for specific temperatures?

 :tipup:

Offline ClearCreek

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Re: Using a thermometer to locate likely spots
« Reply #1 on: Jan 29, 2019, 09:25 PM »
I have heard that temperature is important to fish, and to perch in particular, but I can't get an idea of what to look for. I bought a depth/thermometer, and will start probing as I fish, but has anyone used a thermometer to look for warm/cold spots, or for specific temperatures?

 :tipup:

badger:

In a lake that does not have a big stream or river running into it, the warmest water in the winter when the lake is covered with ice will be on the bottom in the deeper parts of the lake.  The reason for this is water is most dense (heaviest) at 39 degrees F (4 degrees C) so the water of that temperature will sink to the bottom.  If you do a temperature profile of a lake covered with ice, the water temperature right under the ice will be very close to 32 degrees F, and as you proceed down in the water column the water will get warmer gradually until you get near the bottom where the water will be 39 degrees F (or very close).

It is for this reason that when I ice fish for perch I usually fish within a foot or two of the bottom in the deeper part of the lake.

ClearCreek

 

 



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