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Ice Fishing Tips -Check your local regulations! => Hardwater Cuisine => Topic started by: Joe in T.C. on Feb 07, 2018, 10:21 AM

Title: VENISON LOGS
Post by: Joe in T.C. on Feb 07, 2018, 10:21 AM
Its not fish, but I'm guessing I'm not the only person with ground Venison in the freezer who may be looking for new recipes.

I got this sausage recipe from a co worker and thought I would post it here for anyone that would like to try it.

Ingredients:
2 Lbs. Ground Venison
1 Lbs. Ground Pork (Do not substitute pork sausage)
2 TBS. Liquid Smoke
1/3 Cup of Cold Water
3 TBS.  Morton’s Tender Quick Home Meat Cure
1 TBS.  Garlic Salt
1 TBS.  Onion Powder
1 TBS.  Coarsely Ground Black Pepper
2 TBS.  Mustard Seeds
1 TBS.  Crushed Red Pepper




(https://i.imgur.com/RPZ4P3Il.jpg)
1) Place the ground venison and ground pork in a large mixing bowl.
2) Mix the water and liquid smoke together and pour over the meat.
3) Sprinkle dry ingredients over meat.
4) Mix with your hands until all ingredients are very well incorporated.

(https://i.imgur.com/MWwmaQdl.jpg)
5) Cover and chill in your refrigerator for 24 hours.
6) Uncover and mix very well again.

(https://i.imgur.com/icpDhBll.jpg)
7) Heat oven to 325 degrees.
8) Equally divide meat mixture into 3 balls.
9) Evenly roll each ball into a “Venison log” approximately 12 inches long by 2 inches in diameter.
10) Place the logs on a broiler pan and bake for 1 hour (160 degrees internal temperature)


(https://i.imgur.com/Yz9cLQql.jpg)
11) Pat each log with paper towels to help remove any excess grease.
12) Place on wire cooling rack.
13) Dab with paper towels while cooling if needed to remove any excess grease.


(https://i.imgur.com/SEnSYdml.jpg)
Once cooled, wrap well and keep chilled. Can be frozen.


(https://i.imgur.com/CEv2paHl.jpg)
Slice and serve with cheese and crackers, fresh fruit, condiments or my favorite, just by itself.

Note:  I have used ground sirloin with great results when no venison was available.

Good Luck All  :tipup:
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Raquettedacker on Feb 07, 2018, 10:36 AM
That looks awesome......    :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: tbern on Feb 07, 2018, 10:41 AM
Look delicious!
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: deerefishyfishy on Feb 07, 2018, 10:43 AM
Gotta give this one a try! Thanks for sharing
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: littlemelon on Feb 09, 2018, 02:27 PM
Hi,
Dad,mom and I did something like that a few years ago.
It was very good and went fast.


Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: jpohlic on Feb 09, 2018, 03:13 PM
I make one quite similar but I add some diced jalapeno and shredded cheddar cheese
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Whopper Stopper on Feb 10, 2018, 05:52 AM
I just saw this. Yum :thumbsup:

     WS
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: adkiceman1 on Feb 13, 2018, 04:08 PM
I’m going to try this asap
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Stickhick86 on Feb 13, 2018, 04:27 PM
This just sounds amazing, can't wait to try it
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: lipripr on Feb 18, 2018, 01:35 PM
Made a batch this morning using elk. Turned out awesome, very tasty!
Thanks for recipe!
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Kevin23 on Feb 18, 2018, 06:46 PM
If you want to improve on the recipe, ditch the tender quick (it's used for tenderizing whole muscle meat, not ground). The final product will be much less salty and better for you. Pink Salt is what you want for ground meat.

Besides, most recipes call for 1-1.5 TEASPOONS per pound of GROUND meat, and 1 TABLESPOON for whole meat. Since its made for a whole meat application, it's hard to "guess" how much to really use with ground.

Also, since I don't see it noted here.. this product has NO PRESERVATIVES, curing is NOT PRESERVING. So eat it in 4 days or freeze it. You could vac seal it and probably be good for a week in the fridge. Seen a few people go to the ER after eating homemade deer sticks that they thought could sit in the fridge for a month.

If you REALLY want to make some good trail bologna (what you made), look for the LEM Backwoods brand seasonings.
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Joe in T.C. on Feb 18, 2018, 09:11 PM
Thanks for the input, but I am confused on a few of your statements.

My understanding is that curing meat by definition is a way to preserve meat by the addition of salt, nitrates, and nitrites.

I thought Salting, Smoking, and Drying were all methods of preserving.

I like Venison Logs over Trail Bologna, but either way its a type of sausage.

I looked on Morton's website and they state that Morton's Tender Quick is a preserving agent and not a tenderizer.

They also list several recipes that include using Morton's tender Quick with ground meat.
On the first recipe they call for 1 1/2 teaspoons of tender quick plus 1 teaspoon of table salt per pound of ground meat.

Here is the link:  http://www.mortonsalt.com/article/meat-curing-recipes/

Personally I like the recipe but I do agree it may be a bit heavy on the salt.

I also agree that proper refrigeration, cooking temps, food prep and other best methods of cooking are important.

The best part of conflicting information is that it gives us a chance to dig and do some research.

Good Luck All  :tipup:



 
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: captain54 on Feb 19, 2018, 10:13 AM
I use a similar recipe but put the meat in collagen casings and smoke to a internal 165 degree temperature. I just use the tender quick and no salt. 1 1/2 teaspoons per lb. This makes sure no botulism takes place but it doesn't cure the meat. I've kept it for a couple weeks in the refrigerator but it's bet to vacuum pack and freeze.
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Kevin23 on Feb 19, 2018, 04:25 PM
Thanks for the input, but I am confused on a few of your statements.

My understanding is that curing meat by definition is a way to preserve meat by the addition of salt, nitrates, and nitrites.

I thought Salting, Smoking, and Drying were all methods of preserving.

I like Venison Logs over Trail Bologna, but either way its a type of sausage.

I looked on Morton's website and they state that Morton's Tender Quick is a preserving agent and not a tenderizer.

They also list several recipes that include using Morton's tender Quick with ground meat.
On the first recipe they call for 1 1/2 teaspoons of tender quick plus 1 teaspoon of table salt per pound of ground meat.

Here is the link:  http://www.mortonsalt.com/article/meat-curing-recipes/

Personally I like the recipe but I do agree it may be a bit heavy on the salt.

I also agree that proper refrigeration, cooking temps, food prep and other best methods of cooking are important.

The best part of conflicting information is that it gives us a chance to dig and do some research.

Good Luck All  :tipup:


You are curing the meat, not preserving. Look at the back of a slim jim at all the nasty chemicals- those are in there to preserve it so it can sit on the shelf for a year. You don't want any part of this! The native americans used to cut their meat into thin strips (no refrigeration) and lay them over sticks above their fire to smoke them. Then put them in rawhide bags (again, no refrigeration or sanitation) and consume later. They were technically preserving the meat for later, but they also had a life expectancy of 30. Now we use smokers and still can't keep jerky from going bad quickly. I believe they just ate the rancid stuff enough that their guts could handle it.

Tender quick is a curing agent, I misspoke and had "tender" in my mind so I put tenderizer by mistake. They are stretching it saying preserving agent, but I'm sure it is used as such along with other ingredients.

1 1/2 tsp for ground is what most people use. I cannot believe your logs are not very salty with the recipe being 3x that! I made a batch of trail bologna with it once and could barely eat it, which is why i went to pink salt and have had no issues. I use it for everything from smoked sausage to snack sticks, to bologna, to summer sausage.


I have 15lbs of deer sticks in the smoker as I am typing this, all of the cured meats are pretty much the same thing just with a slight alteration in spices and stuffed in different casings. These are with LEM backwoods jerky seasonings and stuffed into 21mm casings. But again, all of this smoked cured meat is NOT PRESERVED! It's good for about 4 days in a ziplock bag, a week to a week and a half in a vacuum sealed bag in the fridge, and well over a year vacuum sealed and in the freezer. I vac seal these sticks the day after I smoke them into serving size packs. They taste the same when thawed, the casings just get soft. Your logs should not change at all after being frozen.
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Joe in T.C. on Feb 19, 2018, 06:30 PM

You are curing the meat, not preserving. Look at the back of a slim jim at all the nasty chemicals- those are in there to preserve it so it can sit on the shelf for a year. You don't want any part of this! The native americans used to cut their meat into thin strips (no refrigeration) and lay them over sticks above their fire to smoke them. Then put them in rawhide bags (again, no refrigeration or sanitation) and consume later. They were technically preserving the meat for later, but they also had a life expectancy of 30. Now we use smokers and still can't keep jerky from going bad quickly. I believe they just ate the rancid stuff enough that their guts could handle it.

Tender quick is a curing agent, I misspoke and had "tender" in my mind so I put tenderizer by mistake. They are stretching it saying preserving agent, but I'm sure it is used as such along with other ingredients.

1 1/2 tsp for ground is what most people use. I cannot believe your logs are not very salty with the recipe being 3x that! I made a batch of trail bologna with it once and could barely eat it, which is why i went to pink salt and have had no issues. I use it for everything from smoked sausage to snack sticks, to bologna, to summer sausage.

I have 15lbs of deer sticks in the smoker as I am typing this, all of the cured meats are pretty much the same thing just with a slight alteration in spices and stuffed in different casings. These are with LEM backwoods jerky seasonings and stuffed into 21mm casings. But again, all of this smoked cured meat is NOT PRESERVED! It's good for about 4 days in a ziplock bag, a week to a week and a half in a vacuum sealed bag in the fridge, and well over a year vacuum sealed and in the freezer. I vac seal these sticks the day after I smoke them into serving size packs. They taste the same when thawed, the casings just get soft. Your logs should not change at all after being frozen.

I have checked numerous resources. If you check the Internet, with coworkers, a Butcher or even your local Smokehouse, they will all tell you that the very definition of Cured Meat, Salted Meat, Smoked Meat or Dehydrated meat is a process used to preserve meat.

This of course does not mean that it should not be kept refrigerated, handled properly, or that it will last forever. It will however extend the shelf life.

I agree Slim Jims and other meats that are kept a room temperature are full of chemical preservatives to accomplish this and they may last more than a year.
 
“Morton Tender Quick mix contains salt, the main preserving agent; sugar, both sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite, curing agents that also contribute to development of color and flavor; and propylene glycol to keep the mixture uniform.”

Some preserved meats will last longer than others, depending on the meat and the method in which it was preserved.

I think we will just have to agree to disagree on this one.

Good luck all  :tipup:
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: esox_xtm on Feb 19, 2018, 08:55 PM
I'll chip in on this. Imagine your surprise... ;)2

Got involved a few decades ago with an established neighborhood group making venison summer sausage. Crude business to start. All mixed by hand on a "sanitized" table, turned into a leaky cast iron stuffer and squeezed out into casings for cold smoking. Yep, you heard right cold. This stuff never sees higher than 120F max and usually is held to 100F or less. This year it was done in 56 hours. Used to think venison sausage was a waste of perfectly good fresh meat but no more.

'Bout 10 - 11 years ago, after I'd become very comfortable with the process my buddy (the sausage wizard) asked me if I knew why it was called "summer sausage". I said, "I dunno" (if you can imagine that). He told me that this recipe was designed to be made during the hunting season and last through the summer without refrigeration. "What??? No way!", I said. He took a stick of sausage fresh from the smokehouse and hung it on a nail in the garage. "We'll eat that next year when you come up to make sausage", he said.

"Right", I'm thinking, "I wanna die young."

Well next year rolled around and we all assembled for the annual ritual and Bill took the sausage off the nail and pounded it on the counter. "Whadda ya think?" he asked.

"I think if you hit someone with that you'd kill 'em", I said. And you would have... I observed it was all white on the out side and called "mold!". He said wet your finger, wipe it and taste. Tell me again. Of course, it was salt. This thing started out as a 2.5" diameter sausage and by the following December, unrefrigerated, it could have been sliced for pepperoni. We ate the whole stick. Very different from "fresh smoked" but very good in it's own way. We've done this every year since with no one getting sick.

Very simple recipe:

Willard’s Surprise Summer Sausage


This is the recipe we have come to use in making venison summer sausage. It is based on an old (old) family recipe from the Ashippun, Wisconsin area and is best cold smoked. This base recipe makes 25# of sausage. Use 60% venison and 40% lean pork (that's 15# venison and 10# pork per batch). We've also used 100% lean beef (like ground round) or beef and pork in the same ratio as venison to pork.

1 cup kosher salt

1/3 cup sugar

1/3 cup black pepper (you can double pepper if you like it like that)

1 tsp pink cure

2 tsp ground coriander

1 tsp ground thyme

Options (for 25# batch):

5 tsp garlic

1/3 cup mustard seed

I have added 1 Tb Habanero powder for hot sausage About 1 tsp per 10# is average heat.

Combine all the dry ingredients thoroughly. Add to mixed meat and mix. When partially integrated add one cup of cold water and finish mixing very well. Allow to stand for 30 minutes to 2 hours (it'll stiffen up considerably). Load the stuffer and put into 2.5" casings. let hang overnight to dry, place in a cool/warm smokehouse until color is through the stick, usually 2 - 3 days. Pull and hang for another 5 - 20 days depending on the dryness desired. Wrap and freeze.

Or, pull some fresh sausage, make a patty and fry in a pan. Very different and very good.

What have I learned? Salt, sugar and smoke all contribute to a "cure". We use the pink salt because we can and it doesn't hurt a thing plus adding an extra margin of safety. You can eat raw venison and raw pork unrefrigerated a year later and be perfectly fine. I'd call it preserved, maybe even "mummified".

So, what you read and what you think you know may now be up for examination. When someone told me this 30 years ago I thought they were nuts. Now, I know better. What's changed? Got a real motorized meat mixer, a nice F. Dick 30# stuffer and a hog ring pliers. Real 20th century stuff... :thumbsup: Other than that,it's still Old World sausage.


Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Joe in T.C. on Feb 20, 2018, 05:13 AM
Thanks for chipping in esox_xtm,

Wow a year later, now that is some shelf life, and now I know why its called summer sausage.

My grandfather used to cure, smoke and hang bacon slabs in the basement and never had a problem.

I will have to try your recipe, never used Habanero powder before.

Good Luck All :tipup:   
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: esox_xtm on Feb 20, 2018, 07:05 AM
Thanks for reminding me of this Joe. I've seen similar stuff before and always intended to try it but then I forget.

If you like hot a teaspoon of the habanero per 8# still is not too hot for even "polite company" unless they're very sensitive to heat. If you're looking for heat it's just right without overdoing it. Do be cautious with the powder, it tends to drift around and burn whatever it touches. Get some on face then rub your eyes. Won't hurt ya, just feels like it does.
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Kevin23 on Feb 20, 2018, 11:23 AM
That sounds like a great recipe esox. REAL summer sausage, pepperoni, and various other meats have been preserved that way for years. But like you said, very different than the "meat log" or anything I make.

You don't need to bring meat up to the 165 internal temp, lots of guys cold smoke sausages. As long as you have the proper PH and salinity, the bacteria will be killed. Pepperoni is smoked at about 100 degrees and then left to dry out for weeks to months. But that takes knowledge of what you are doing, for the home chef, bring it to 165- especially if you add any store purchased fat or meat.  ;)
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Joe in T.C. on Feb 20, 2018, 05:01 PM
That sounds like a great recipe esox. REAL summer sausage, pepperoni, and various other meats have been preserved that way for years. But like you said, very different than the "meat log" or anything I make.

You don't need to bring meat up to the 165 internal temp, lots of guys cold smoke sausages. As long as you have the proper PH and salinity, the bacteria will be killed. Pepperoni is smoked at about 100 degrees and then left to dry out for weeks to months. But that takes knowledge of what you are doing, for the home chef, bring it to 165- especially if you add any store purchased fat or meat.  ;)

Yes it does sound great, and hanging on the wall for a year certainly does make it very different than “Fresh Smoked”.

I completely agree that proper levels of salt, nitrite and nitrate will kill Botulinum and a host of other nasty things. Regardless if it’s cold smoked, hot smoked or not smoked. And meat with lower PH levels can help with nitrite burn if it’s an issue.

You may not use Morton’s Tender Quick and prefer Pink Salt instead. Which is fine, to each their own, but the ingredients are very similar.
Of course pink salts contain more nitrites and nitrates so less is required, but a lot of the recipes I've seen also call for added table salt along with the pink salt.

Tender Quick contains: Salt, sugar, sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate, and propylene glycol.

Pink Salt Cure #1 contains: Salt, sodium nitrite, and FD & C Red #3

Pink Salt Cure #2 contains: Salt, sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate, and FD & C Red #3

At least it sounds like we are starting to agree on some things. :woot:

Good Luck all  :tipup:
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: bullpine on Mar 04, 2018, 07:36 PM
One venison patty, grill along side thin sliced ham and top patty with cheddar cheese and hot ham.  Sandwich it with mayo, chile sauce inside toasted sour dough bread.  Forget sausage.
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Mikepb1987 on Mar 15, 2018, 05:31 PM
Wow I might have to grind up the rest of my venison to try this out
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Gills-only on Mar 15, 2018, 06:01 PM
I have made it 3-4 times, had to double the batch last time!!
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Walleyewacker007 on Mar 17, 2018, 11:33 AM
Awesome thread here! Love me some smoked meats. I would avoid any nitrates or nitrites, these are linked to colorectal cancer.
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: esox_xtm on Mar 18, 2018, 02:27 PM
Awesome thread here! Love me some smoked meats. I would avoid any nitrates or nitrites, these are linked to colorectal cancer.

As far as the nitrates/nitrites go I wouldn't be too alarmed unless you're eating good amounts of this stuff everyday. I eat bacon twice a week, cured sausage and hot sticks when I want to. I successfully deferred my first c-scope for an entire decade (till I was 60) and was pronounced "squeaky clean" by the no-sense-of-humor doc. Nothing to even biopsy, see me again in ten years.  :clap:

Or maybe it's just the daily doses of weaponized hot peppers and tequila...  @)

Seriously, it's like HFCS (high fructose corn syrup), not intrinsically evil in and of itself. But you can get too much if you're not mindful of the processed foods you frequent.
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: ActiveTrapChecker on Mar 18, 2018, 02:33 PM
Nicely done, thanks for sharing!!!
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: esox_xtm on Mar 18, 2018, 05:51 PM
Hey ATC, definitely not gospel, just my 2 cents based on experience. User mileage may vary. Everyone will have their own opinion based on their experience.
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: esox_xtm on Mar 18, 2018, 05:57 PM
Kinda like this:

Grandpa: What the... what the he11 is this?

John: That's lite beer.

Grandpa: Gee, I weigh ninety g**d*** pounds, and you bring me this sloppin' foam?

John: Ariel's got me on a diet because the doc said my cholestorol's a little too high.

Grandpa: Well let me tell you something now, Johnny. Last Thursday, I turned 95 years old. And I never exercised a day in my life. Every morning, I wake up, and I smoke a cigarette. And then I eat five strips of bacon. And for lunch, I eat a bacon sandwich. And for a midday snack?

John: Bacon.

Grandpa: Bacon! A whole d*** plate! And I usually drink my dinner. Now according to all of them flat-belly experts, I should've took a dirt nap like thirty years ago. But each year comes and goes, and I'm still here. Ha! And they keep dyin'. You know? Sometimes I wonder if God forgot about me. Just goes to show you, huh?

John: What?

Grandpa: Huh?

John: Goes to show you what?

Grandpa: Well it just goes... what the he11 are you talkin' about?

John: Well you said you drink beer, you eat bacon and you smoke cigarettes, and you outlive most of the experts.

Grandpa: Yeah?

John: I thought maybe there was a moral.

Grandpa: No, there ain't no moral. I just like that story. That's all. Like that story.

 @) ;)2

Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: deerefishyfishy on Mar 18, 2018, 07:53 PM
 :bow: :bow: :bow: :clap: :thumbsup: :roflmao:  one of my favorites. I'm only 35 but feel like I belong in that movie! Well said esox
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Richi on Sep 03, 2018, 08:39 AM

Looks very tasty :P :P
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Richi on Sep 03, 2018, 08:39 AM

Looks very tasty :P :P
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: my-marty on Oct 01, 2018, 10:12 PM
Killer recipe, just got mine out of the smoker and it is a keeper. Definitely gonna drag the grinder back out and make a triple batch of this and freeze it to get me through hard water season. Thanks for sharing this   :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: eastchannel on Oct 18, 2018, 04:24 PM
I've been meaning to make this recipe for awhile, finally got around to it. I added 1/2 teaspoon of white pepper, used garlic powder instead of salt & 1/2 a cup of real maple syrup (tap my own trees). A little heat & a little sweet, made in the smoker. Heaven!
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: perchnut on Oct 19, 2018, 08:43 AM
What temps are you smoking this summer sausage at?  (did I miss that?)....I think I have just enough venison left in the freezer to give this a whirl....and two pork butts in there as well.....cant wait.
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: my-marty on Oct 30, 2018, 06:35 PM
I have a master built electric smokers so max temp is 275. That is what I smoked it at with apple pellets.
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: captain54 on Nov 06, 2018, 07:16 AM
I put mine in 2.5 x 20" long casings and in the smoker for 4.5 hours a 165 degrees. I added high temp cheddar cheese to mine I just made 3 a couple days ago. They turn out great. I don't use a lot of smoke just one pan about at the half way point. I case the meat and let them in the refrigerator for a couple days. The spice blends in better, I take them out of the refrigerator for a couple hours so they room temperature then into the smoker.
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Iceassin on Nov 10, 2018, 06:17 AM
Its not fish, but I'm guessing I'm not the only person with ground Venison in the freezer who may be looking for new recipes.

I got this sausage recipe from a co worker and thought I would post it here for anyone that would like to try it.

Ingredients:
2 Lbs. Ground Venison
1 Lbs. Ground Pork (Do not substitute pork sausage)
2 TBS. Liquid Smoke
1/3 Cup of Cold Water
3 TBS.  Morton’s Tender Quick Home Meat Cure
1 TBS.  Garlic Salt
1 TBS.  Onion Powder
1 TBS.  Coarsely Ground Black Pepper
2 TBS.  Mustard Seeds
1 TBS.  Crushed Red Pepper




(https://i.imgur.com/RPZ4P3Il.jpg)
1) Place the ground venison and ground pork in a large mixing bowl.
2) Mix the water and liquid smoke together and pour over the meat.
3) Sprinkle dry ingredients over meat.
4) Mix with your hands until all ingredients are very well incorporated.

(https://i.imgur.com/MWwmaQdl.jpg)
5) Cover and chill in your refrigerator for 24 hours.
6) Uncover and mix very well again.

(https://i.imgur.com/icpDhBll.jpg)
7) Heat oven to 325 degrees.
8) Equally divide meat mixture into 3 balls.
9) Evenly roll each ball into a “Venison log” approximately 12 inches long by 2 inches in diameter.
10) Place the logs on a broiler pan and bake for 1 hour (160 degrees internal temperature)


(https://i.imgur.com/Yz9cLQql.jpg)
11) Pat each log with paper towels to help remove any excess grease.
12) Place on wire cooling rack.
13) Dab with paper towels while cooling if needed to remove any excess grease.


(https://i.imgur.com/SEnSYdml.jpg)
Once cooled, wrap well and keep chilled. Can be frozen.


(https://i.imgur.com/CEv2paHl.jpg)
Slice and serve with cheese and crackers, fresh fruit, condiments or my favorite, just by itself.

Note:  I have used ground sirloin with great results when no venison was available.

Good Luck All  :tipup:

Hey Joe... and all. Anyone ever add shredded cheese to this recipe? Thinking maybe a cup or so would work.  :-\
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: esox_xtm on Nov 10, 2018, 07:11 AM
Since this recipe hits 325F and is technically "cooked" a high melt temperature cheese is required or it would melt out all over the place. One of the guys we make sausage with adds cheese and it is killer. He still gets the hi-temp cheese even though we cold smoke.

All about high melt temp cheese (https://www.google.com/search?q=high+temperature+cheese+sausage&oq=high+temperature+cheese+sausage&aqs=chrome..69i57.17371j0j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8)
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Iceassin on Nov 10, 2018, 07:16 AM
Since this recipe hits 325F and is technically "cooked" a high melt temperature cheese is required or it would melt out all over the place. One of the guys we make sausage with adds cheese and it is killer. He still gets the hi-temp cheese even though we cold smoke.

All about high melt temp cheese (https://www.google.com/search?q=high+temperature+cheese+sausage&oq=high+temperature+cheese+sausage&aqs=chrome..69i57.17371j0j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8)

I used to have a similar recipe to this (looked this morning...couldn't find it...and don't remember who gave it to me) that "baked" at something like 200* for 4-6 hours...probably would work at that temp. Maybe I'll try it. :-\
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Gills-only on Nov 10, 2018, 07:17 AM
Scroll to top of posting and it’s baked, that’s how I make it
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: esox_xtm on Nov 10, 2018, 07:32 AM
Cooking, baking... For me, after 40 plus years baking bread, it's cooked. Baking is for bread. I know, it's just me.

From the directions at the top:

7) Heat oven to 325 degrees.
8) Equally divide meat mixture into 3 balls.
9) Evenly roll each ball into a “Venison log” approximately 12 inches long by 2 inches in diameter.
10) Place the logs on a broiler pan and bake for 1 hour (160 degrees internal temperature)

Oh, he did say "bake". Silly me  ;)2

Nevertheless, bake, smoke, cook you still need the high temp cheese.
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Iceassin on Nov 10, 2018, 08:10 AM
Cooking, baking... For me, after 40 plus years baking bread, it's cooked. Baking is for bread. I know, it's just me.

From the directions at the top:

7) Heat oven to 325 degrees.
8) Equally divide meat mixture into 3 balls.
9) Evenly roll each ball into a “Venison log” approximately 12 inches long by 2 inches in diameter.
10) Place the logs on a broiler pan and bake for 1 hour (160 degrees internal temperature)

Oh, he did say "bake". Silly me  ;)2

Nevertheless, bake, smoke, cook you still need the high temp cheese.

So what does "half-baked" mean? My short term memory isn't as good as it used to be. :whistle:
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: tbern on Nov 10, 2018, 08:21 AM
So what does "half-baked" mean? My short term memory isn't as good as it used to be. :whistle:
.  "A Requirement to become a politician  in this country" ...
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Iceassin on Nov 10, 2018, 08:24 AM
.  "A Requirement to become a politician  in this country" ...

 :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao:
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: esox_xtm on Nov 10, 2018, 08:35 AM
Half-baked = esox_xtm. On a good day...  :whistle:
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: ActiveTrapChecker on Nov 12, 2018, 08:32 PM
Was hoping to give this a shot for camp this weekend, but having issues locating the Morton’s cure in a pinch. Does anyone have a suggested substitute?

Thanks in advance for any help
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: happyheber on Nov 12, 2018, 09:19 PM
Was hoping to give this a shot for camp this weekend, but having issues locating the Morton’s cure in a pinch. Does anyone have a suggested substitute?
realsalt  ;D
Thanks in advance for any help
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: ActiveTrapChecker on Nov 13, 2018, 06:59 AM


Thanks, just wasn't sure if the low amounts nitrates and nitrites made a difference, being a newbie to the process
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: PoleJerker on Dec 04, 2018, 11:18 AM
Looks tasty.  My mouth is watering.
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: happyheber on Dec 04, 2018, 08:20 PM
While we are discussing real salt. Real salt is an all natural mineral salt. Only found in Central Utah. It has over 50 trace minerals. For you that like to BBQ or smoke meats they have season salt, onion salt, and Garlic salt, that are made with organic seasonings. They are second to none. 1-800-FOR-SALT  They ship all over the world. Japan is their number one customer. Go Figure. Tight Lines HH
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: uncleshorty on Dec 24, 2018, 04:43 PM
I wanted to try this sausage and like all my new recipe charcuterie projects I made up a 1/2 batch.  I used ground sirloin, (RATS, no venison this year...).

It's good.  A little salty for me but I don't eat much salt.  As far as I'm concerned the recipe is fine as is.  The only thing I might try in the future is a 1/2 tsp each of ground cloves and allspice and some soy flour binder.

Xmas tomorrow so this will be on the board along w/ assorted cheeses, a variety of crackers and some German Mustard.

Thanks for posting this.

Life is GOOD!!!
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: Iceattic on Jan 16, 2019, 08:41 AM
Looks Good! Do you have to use the pork? My brother and I make jerky with the jerky gun and use no pork.
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: esox_xtm on Jan 16, 2019, 10:37 AM
The logs are more like a sausage than jerky. Less fat in jerky is good.with sausage/logs you need a little fat (from pork or whatever) to keep things from becoming too dry and carry flavor throughout the product. The log recipe @ 66/33 is a little leaner than our sausage @ 60/40. Our finished sausage comes out 92% lean with that ratio, something you'll never find in commercially made products. The logs are leaner still.
Title: Re: Venison Logs
Post by: esox_xtm on Jan 16, 2019, 10:58 AM
Was hoping to give this a shot for camp this weekend, but having issues locating the Morton’s cure in a pinch. Does anyone have a suggested substitute?

Thanks in advance for any help

Don't know how I missed this. Regular, plain or "real" salt is not a substitute for Tender Quick. TQ is a curing salt rather than an actual "tenderizer" and contains both nitrates and nitrates along with some anti-cake. The addition of nitrates/nitrites is required to combat botulism. Pink curing salt/Prague powder is a combination of plain table salt (sodium chloride) and sodium nitrite and would be the most direct substitution along with other products sold as "curing salt". Regular salt can be used to "cure" foods but is not a "curing salt"

Other operations in sausage making also contribute to the safety of the finished product: controlled dehydration and smoke along with the added salts. Nitrates, nitrites and chlorides are all salts of various metals. Sodium chloride is plain salt as you know it, potassium nitrate is a gunpowder component, potassium chloride is a "no sodium" table salt alternative, calcium chloride is an ice melter and gold nitrate is a long effective arthritis treatment.

Mind your processing Ps & Qs especially if making a cold smoked (uncooked) product. Cleanliness, proper formulation and a good smoking all contribute to a safe, quality finished product. Cooked sausage is more forgiving.