Author Topic: Tip up weight  (Read 875 times)

Offline Esox fisherman

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Tip up weight
« on: Nov 12, 2020, 05:37 AM »
If i get split shots for my tip ups in one size what should it be

Online Reinert

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Re: Tip up weight
« Reply #1 on: Nov 12, 2020, 05:47 AM »
 1/4 oz is what I usually keep on hand for tip ups, I dont use them enough to say I know what I'm doing though

Offline Esox fisherman

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Re: Tip up weight
« Reply #2 on: Nov 12, 2020, 05:48 AM »
Thx for the straight answer
(also actually using rubber core sinkers but not as many people know what they are or use them)

Offline Iceassin

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Re: Tip up weight
« Reply #3 on: Nov 12, 2020, 07:17 AM »
Depends on the size of bait (minnow ) you are using. I like bell stinkers. I buy an assortment pack...various weights. Tie a snap swivel on the end of the line for easy switch of sinker. I use one heavy enough to get the bait down yet light enough to allow it to swim/stay active. If you run the hook off the end of the line, then attach the snap swivel a couple of feet above the hook.
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Offline esox_xtm

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Re: Tip up weight
« Reply #4 on: Nov 12, 2020, 08:50 AM »
Split shot usually come in a number or letter size and not an actual weight. From smallest to largest: B, BB, 3/0, 7, 5, 4, 3 and 2. I used to carry one of those pancake things with all the sizes but found the 3s and 7s ran out all the time so that's about all I pack now. If I need something between 3 and 7 or over 7 I just add a second (or even a third) shot.

My preference is also for the "non-removable" shot because those little pointy ears snag on weeds very easily.
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Offline Spider1

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Re: Tip up weight
« Reply #5 on: Nov 12, 2020, 09:08 AM »
Like Iceassin said, it depends on the size of the bait. If it's a small minnow, then a smallish split shot will do. If it's a bigger bait I'll use bigger shot. I'm just trying to keep the minnow from swimming in too big a radius and putting off any predator.

Offline esox_xtm

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Re: Tip up weight
« Reply #6 on: Nov 12, 2020, 09:14 AM »
There's science in shotting also. One giant shot is not the same as an equal weight of smaller shot spread apart on your line. One acts as a literal anchor the other allows limited swimming within a restricted radius without it being too active. There's a time for each.
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Offline Junkie4Ice

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Re: Tip up weight
« Reply #7 on: Nov 12, 2020, 11:51 AM »
There's science in shotting also. One giant shot is not the same as an equal weight of smaller shot spread apart on your line. One acts as a literal anchor the other allows limited swimming within a restricted radius without it being too active. There's a time for each.

It sounds like you're talking about "drop-shotting" with a tip up? Interesting concept. I know drop shotting really gained popularity the last few years. Interesting concept for tip ups, I might have to give that a try. Like you said, it definitely would give you some versatility for working the bottom.
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Online DR.SPECKLER

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Re: Tip up weight
« Reply #8 on: Nov 12, 2020, 04:09 PM »
If i use any sinker its a 1/4 oz egg sinker above my barrel swivel that has my mono or wire leader attached.if im fishing shallow say under 8ft i dont put any lead on.

Offline R-K

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Re: Tip up weight
« Reply #9 on: Nov 12, 2020, 04:23 PM »
There's science in shotting also. One giant shot is not the same as an equal weight of smaller shot spread apart on your line. One acts as a literal anchor the other allows limited swimming within a restricted radius without it being too active. There's a time for each.

Now this is something I hadn't thought of before- I do this with my river drifting rigs (steelhead bobber rigs), but hadn't thought about doing it with my tip-ups. Care to elaborate?
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Offline missoulafish

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Re: Tip up weight
« Reply #10 on: Nov 12, 2020, 04:33 PM »
bobber dogging ;)

Online DR.SPECKLER

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Re: Tip up weight
« Reply #11 on: Nov 12, 2020, 04:40 PM »
bobber dogging ;)
ol bobber doggin.did some of that today at the river..

Offline 800stealth

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Re: Tip up weight
« Reply #12 on: Nov 12, 2020, 05:02 PM »
Bobber doggin.... Had to google that one, thought you guys were taking this thread way off the road at first LOL.

Offline esox_xtm

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Re: Tip up weight
« Reply #13 on: Nov 12, 2020, 06:44 PM »
Now this is something I hadn't thought of before- I do this with my river drifting rigs (steelhead bobber rigs), but hadn't thought about doing it with my tip-ups. Care to elaborate?

 Sure. I learned a good bit from a guy named Mick Thill about shotting a line below a float. Lotsa science. I have since transferred that knowledge to weighting when tipup fishing. Placement of weight on a line dictates how active any bait might be. From day to day fish may prefer a very active bait to a very static bait. Most often something in between.

Let's look at the extremes. Dead bait... Totally and completely static, unmoving except for random currents. I fish a lot of deads at time and tend to do much better if they move a bit, like under a Windlass tipup. Sure, I can catch fish that just hang there and sometimes motion is better but it's still incumbent on me to determine what will be the best presentation for the given day.

On the other end I've got some terrific live bait. Swims like crazy. Great right? Maybe not. Maybe it's better if it just vibrates/wiggles mostly in place rather that swim on erratic circles. Here's where shotting comes in. Lots of weight near that active minnow allows almost no swimming (like a jig), anchoring that "buzzing TV" in pretty much one spot. Super easy target you don't have to chase. On the other end, with no weight, that minnow can swim unfettered all over, where ever it wants with ease creating a chase me/catch me scenario. Sometimes fish prefer that but (my experience) not all that often.

Most often it's somewhere between static and overactive. The challenge is to match your bait presentation to your prey preference. This is a good discussion and there will be lots of opinions. My belief is that from day to day, from lake to lake conditions change and those that are most willing to adapt to daily (maybe hourly) conditions do much better than the rest that set it and forget it.
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