Author Topic: Ice chisel / spud weight  (Read 2831 times)

Offline sodakdave

  • Team IceShanty Regular
  • ***
  • Posts: 296
Ice chisel / spud weight
« on: Dec 04, 2017, 11:06 PM »
What is an acceptable weight for an ice chisel to function properly to check the ice thickness?

I was at the store the other day and took a look at the Eskimo 2-piece chisel. It seems really heavy. I just can't imagine myself pounding the ice with it every step during my walk out. I wouldn't have an arm left to fish with by the time I got to a spot.

I can also see going too far the other way, where a chisel wouldn't be heavy enough to really be effective.

Where's the happy medium?

I know the Eskimo chisel is only 11 lbs, and as dead weight that's not an issue, but lifting and pounding every step or two would be (for me).

On the other hand, something like the Cabela's brand chisel is only 6 lbs. Light enough that I can see myself using it over a long distance, but is it heavy enough to be effective?

Thoughts?

Offline Ice Scratcher

  • Iceshanty Militia
  • Team IceShanty Maniac
  • *
  • Posts: 2,903
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #1 on: Dec 04, 2017, 11:22 PM »
You just have to understand the capabilities of the tool in your hand...

Pounds per square inch has everything to do with it..

A simple piece of rebar sharpened like a pencil can tell you a lot...

Sometimes it might be more about hardness, than how thick, I've been on 2ft I felt lucky to make it back from..

Also, a tool for checking safety, and one for cutting actual fishing holes could be entirely different...

<)))>{

Offline sodakdave

  • Team IceShanty Regular
  • ***
  • Posts: 296
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #2 on: Dec 04, 2017, 11:26 PM »
I'm not going to be using it for cutting holes, just for safety. I got one with a staggered tooth pattern because I figured that would be more effective than a 2" wide piece of flat still.

I'm probably overthinking it (as I am known to do).

Just bash the ice a few times and get a feel for how much it takes out per hit and go with that.

Offline skifisher

  • Team IceShanty Regular
  • ***
  • Posts: 371
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #3 on: Dec 06, 2017, 06:22 AM »
I don't think weight is the issue. I use a spud bar to check not only the thickness of the ice, but the quality and tone of the ice. Like Ice Scratcher said, 2 feet of ice can be as sketchy as 2 inches of black ice. The important thing to remember is ice thickness varies, and other factors like your weight and how much gear you're toting are all factors in how safe you are. If it don't feel right, IT AIN'T!
"Ice fishing...ah, the anticipation! 🎣

Offline hardwater diehard

  • Team IceShantyholic
  • ***
  • Posts: 6,357
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #4 on: Dec 06, 2017, 07:03 AM »
I would suggest an economy one piece chisel ..weigh between 4.5-5.5 lbs..heavy enough to get the job done and light enough to bring every outing ...one piece means no parts to lose .Eskimo ..Frabill ..Mills Fleet Farm have versions that you can find online with discounts and sales ...$20-$25.

http://www.cabelas.com/catalog/product.jsp?productId=2581713&type=product&WT.z_btnclk=YMAL-2581713&WT.z_pg_ref=prd1083142

use code 7HOLIDAY free shipping
Give a man a fish he eats for a day .Teach a man to ice fish he has an obsession for a lifetime

Offline sodakdave

  • Team IceShanty Regular
  • ***
  • Posts: 296
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #5 on: Dec 06, 2017, 07:22 AM »
I would suggest an economy one piece chisel ..weigh between 4.5-5.5 lbs..heavy enough to get the job done and light enough to bring every outing ...one piece means no parts to lose .Eskimo ..Frabill ..Mills Fleet Farm have versions that you can find online with discounts and sales ...$20-$25.


I ended up getting the Cabela's one piece at 6 lbs. Now to just get striker to ship my suit and I'll be set.

Offline Rugburn

  • Team IceShanty Addict
  • *
  • Posts: 853
  • Carpeted boat + rough water = RUGBURN
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #6 on: Dec 06, 2017, 07:35 AM »
My home made spud weighs in at 4lbs. Wouldn't want any more than that or I might not use it. I used a hollow piece of common pipe, then pressed in a 1 foot piece of solid round on the business end with a chisel point ground on. On the handle end I used tool wrap to protect my hand from the cold metal. Finished it of with a piece of rope for a wrist sling. The trouble with using rebar is that it has no spine stiffness. Like an arrow good spine stiffness gives you good penetration. Last winter I made a few extras for my fishing buds, now I just let these guys go first. LOL.









Online filetandrelease

  • Team IceShantyholic
  • ***
  • Posts: 8,140
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #7 on: Dec 06, 2017, 07:46 AM »

I retired my old green monster due to a weakened shoulder , I ended up buying a economy redneck chisel 4.5 lbs , I thought about using my home made probing bar that I used for many years of construction work but Im retired and so is it , it is what ice scratcher  described , long as you have something to use
 

Offline hardwater diehard

  • Team IceShantyholic
  • ***
  • Posts: 6,357
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #8 on: Dec 06, 2017, 07:48 AM »
I ended up getting the Cabela's one piece at 6 lbs. Now to just get striker to ship my suit and I'll be set.

Nice ...little practice to get use to the sound of the thud ...
Give a man a fish he eats for a day .Teach a man to ice fish he has an obsession for a lifetime

Offline todalake

  • Team IceShanty Regular
  • ***
  • Posts: 125
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #9 on: Dec 14, 2017, 08:38 AM »
My home made spud weighs in at 4lbs. Wouldn't want any more than that or I might not use it. I used a hollow piece of common pipe, then pressed in a 1 foot piece of solid round on the business end with a chisel point ground on. On the handle end I used tool wrap to protect my hand from the cold metal. Finished it of with a piece of rope for a wrist sling. The trouble with using rebar is that it has no spine stiffness. Like an arrow good spine stiffness gives you good penetration. Last winter I made a few extras for my fishing buds, now I just let these guys go first. LOL.







Where do you get tool wrap?
Clam Base Camp Thermal
Clam Legend Thermal
Nils 6"
Rigid 780#

Offline sivers89

  • IceShanty Rookie
  • **
  • Posts: 9
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #10 on: Dec 14, 2017, 09:39 AM »
I made one out of 1 inch rebar and a piece of spring steel for the blade. It's right around 8 pounds. Makes for quick work cleaning up holes and if that thing doesn't break the ice I know I'm good to go.
Earth provides enough to satisfy every man's needs, but not every man's greed.

Offline Rugburn

  • Team IceShanty Addict
  • *
  • Posts: 853
  • Carpeted boat + rough water = RUGBURN
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #11 on: Dec 14, 2017, 10:41 AM »
 The tool wrap was something a guy gave me. Stretchy rubberized stuff that electrical workers use on their tools to prevent accidental contact with live circuits.

Offline Open-Handed Fish Slap

  • Team IceShanty Regular
  • ***
  • Posts: 268
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #12 on: Dec 14, 2017, 11:18 AM »
Probably F4 tape (or similar), the stuff is pretty amazing
It's like tailgating with the possibility of catching a fish!

Offline sodakdave

  • Team IceShanty Regular
  • ***
  • Posts: 296
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #13 on: Dec 14, 2017, 11:20 AM »
I wonder is something like regrip would work

https://re-grip.com/

Offline Rugburn

  • Team IceShanty Addict
  • *
  • Posts: 853
  • Carpeted boat + rough water = RUGBURN
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #14 on: Dec 14, 2017, 11:28 AM »
 That looks like it would work great. When I slap projects like this together I try and use stuff I have on hand. Zero cost is a good goal. But that re-grip stuff would make your spud a Pro model!

Offline Chris338378

  • Team IceShantyholic
  • ***
  • Posts: 6,153
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #15 on: Dec 14, 2017, 11:30 AM »
A few of my friends and I have the Eskimo Economy Chisel which only weighs  4 1/2 pounds to check for safe ice and it works very well and doesn't beat you up.  They're a one piece design and cost about $20.  The only thing you have to add is a lanyard in case it breaks through the ice you don't loose it, I made one out of an old shoe lace.

Offline JayWirth

  • IceShanty Rookie
  • **
  • Posts: 3
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #16 on: Dec 15, 2017, 06:53 AM »
I have at least 4 different Spuds and each has gotten lighter and more compact the more I fish.  The old ones are close to 20lbs long steel bars that are relegated to prying out big rocks and tree stumps in the summer.  The Eskimo chisel / hammer thing looks useful though right now I have a 4ft pipe threaded to a solid steel end about 6lbs.  I like being able to unscrew the handle so all fits nice in the sled.
Everyone has a responsibility to not only tolerate another person's point of view, but also to accept it eagerly as a challenge to your own understanding. And express those challenges in terms of serving other people. Arlo Guthrie

Offline Uncle Al

  • Team IceShanty Addict
  • *
  • Posts: 755
  • STAND FOR THE FLAG, KNEEL FOR THE CROSS
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #17 on: Dec 20, 2017, 08:18 AM »
I had the same spud for 30 years. Used it to open new and old holes
 It was a piece of 3/4in black pipe about arm pit length had a pipe tee on one end with a rope for my wrist and a piece of 2in flat stock with a chisel grind welded on the bottom. Its on the bottom of saginaw bay now.

Offline FISHAMANIAC

  • IceShanty Rookie
  • **
  • Posts: 18
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #18 on: Dec 28, 2017, 12:27 PM »
I personally am not a fan of the junk Eskimo and Clam  chipping bars sold at the major retailers.. Thin walled tubing for the handle a decent chipping heads just not enough for me to be content with.. I use a custom chipping bar that I machine and fab it weighs 13lbs and  I've never fell thru while inspecting..

Offline walleye-guy

  • IceShanty Rookie
  • **
  • Posts: 10
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #19 on: Jan 01, 2018, 09:53 PM »
I got one of those 2 piece Eskimos and it's way to heavy to judge ice tried it early this year its a good shack chisel but not for checking ice I learned.... I iwent back to my jiffy mille lacs chisel not sure on weight but lighter and better to judge ice if I can hit it as hard as I can in front of me and not go through it's safe to keep going....    early ice chisels are cheap enough considering there the difference between safely fishing or seeing if u can swim in freezing water

Offline Corndog

  • Team IceShanty Regular
  • ***
  • Posts: 478
  • waiting for the ice....
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #20 on: Jan 02, 2018, 08:52 AM »
I think there's a misconception when it comes to spud bars and chisels. If the intended purpose is to check ice thickness for safety, any simple bar 50 to 60 inches in length with a tapered end will suffice. The bar can be hollow to reduce weight. I think many confuse this type of spud bar, with one that is intended to create holes in the ice to either jig through or set tip-ups in. The two are very different. And like most everything on the planet that we consider buying, research is key. Which is why forums are a Great place to start.
Many of the spuds used to open ice to fish are weighted between 10 to 13 pounds to use that weight and the stepped down grooved chiseled tip as a way to make chips of ice fly. These type bars are great for this, but due to the added weight are, in my opinion, a bit heavy when checking the safety of the ice. But, if you want to go back to basics and skip dragging a sled, flip over and a ton of gear and instead just want to run and gun, there is something to be said for using a bar of this type. Many have created their own designs or copied others to create there's and as mentioned there are a ton sold by various manufacturers.
I would suggest first seeing if you intend on just using it for checking the thickness of the ice, or if you want to be able to open a hole up to fish, before deciding on which will suit your needs.
Good luck and tight lines!
It is what it is....

Offline Uncle Al

  • Team IceShanty Addict
  • *
  • Posts: 755
  • STAND FOR THE FLAG, KNEEL FOR THE CROSS
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #21 on: Jan 02, 2018, 09:24 AM »
When I started fishing I didn't even have a spud. I had a sled made from a pop case with 2 rod's in it, a container of mousies, and a skimmer. I found holes from last night that I could kick open with the heel of my boot, and started fishing. Perch were the only fish you would catch as the walleye hadn't been introduced to saginaw bay, and you would always catch some. I'm not sure anyone uses a spud today for what it was intended to be used for. Everyone has some sort of auger, gas, electric, or hand driven, and most have never spudded a hole in the ice. Some places I fish I use a spud to open old holes, and I also own a Jiffy gas that I've had for at least 30 years. The jiffy gets heavier every year, but it still runs and still drills great holes. As for the spud, if I'm walking, I've got the spud in one hand banging the ice in front of me every step of the way, old habits are hard to break. If you're young get a heavy one, If you're old get one made from black pipe, 3/4in and put a pipe T on the top for a handle and a rope so it doesn't go the bottom if you drop it. Keep it close you never know.

Offline Hooked up

  • Team IceShanty Regular
  • ***
  • Posts: 128
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #22 on: Jan 24, 2018, 10:01 PM »
Pick any weight you are comfortable carrying (I prefer a lighter Spud bar) and learn how many strikes on the ice it takes to go through ice that is not safe.

Offline Mountain Maggot

  • Team IceShanty Regular
  • ***
  • Posts: 309
  • Waiting for the next Ice Age
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #23 on: Jan 31, 2018, 06:08 AM »
The advantage of a spud over 10 lbs, is that if you drop it from 1 foot, it will go through 2 inches of ice.  That is why they have the hand sling.  While one person can walk or fish on 2 inches, a lake with a 2 inch cap might still have some areas of dangerous 1 inch zones.  This is particularly true of late season ice where the shoreline can melt to skim ice along the banks while you are out where the ice is 2 inches thick.

That being said, I dont venture out unless I have 3 inches of ice that a spud will not penetrate on the single drop.

Offline esox slayer

  • Team IceShanty Maniac
  • **
  • Posts: 2,073
Re: Ice chisel / spud weight
« Reply #24 on: Jan 31, 2018, 06:11 AM »
Mine is a seven foot long piece of 9 bar rebar with a 2 inch wide piece of 1/2 inch bar stock notched and  welded to the end....
Marine Infantry NCO- Semper Fi!!!

 



Follow Iceshanty at Twitter Iceshanty Facebook Page Iceshanty Youtube Channel
Iceshanty | MyFishFinder | MyHuntingForum
Contact | Disclaimer | Privacypolicy | Sponsor
© 1996- Iceshanty.com
All Rights Reserved.