Author Topic: ICE SAFETY - A CHILLING reminder  (Read 624 times)

Offline POk3s

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ICE SAFETY - A CHILLING reminder
« on: Nov 03, 2021, 04:35 PM »
Before we all got out on first ice this year, I wanted to put this short video out. It was a little bit of a freak deal, but it could’ve ended very badly and really, I think these freak deals are what we all need to be prepared for. The obvious stuff isn’t what gets us.

Trent Williams
When hell freezes over, I’ll ice fish there too!

Offline Snitch#8

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Re: ICE SAFETY - A CHILLING reminder
« Reply #1 on: Dec 18, 2021, 05:48 AM »
This is another testament as to why it is imperative to continually check the ice.  I have ice fished for over fifty years on both small inland lakes and the Saginaw Bay.  I have found ice that is over a foot or more thick in one spot and right next to very thick, safe ice, I may find 2 or 3 inches.  You may also find ice that is a foot thick and it still isn't safe to be on.  Even thick ice can become "honey combed", making it very dangerous.  This ice condition occurs from continued freezing and thawing, usually in the early fall and early spring.   Ice may "not" form consistently over a lake because of many factors.  Water current, springs, bottom contour, bottom structure, weed growth, and even shore contour may have an effect on ice thickness.  Like in the video, snow cover can also be a major contributing factor in how much ice there is in any given spot.  Pressure cracks formed by shifting ice can also make for dangerous ice conditions.  It is best to check the ice often, especially if you see a change in ice color or if traveling over uneven ice or from clear ice to show covered.  Using both an ice spud and caution will increase your chances of staying safe and having a great day on the ice!  I'm sure many of you already know much of what I have said, please consider this a reminder.  For those of you who are new to the sport, consider this a warning!!!  As Always, Take Care and Stay Safe.

Offline A man called horse

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Re: ICE SAFETY - A CHILLING reminder
« Reply #2 on: Dec 18, 2021, 10:47 PM »
A technique ive not seen anyone else do is the canoe as your sled. I have done this many times. It permits taking along a lot of gear and if you have any thin ice suspicions just straddle the bow or stern till your convinced its safe.

Offline Snitch#8

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Re: ICE SAFETY - A CHILLING reminder
« Reply #3 on: Dec 19, 2021, 08:55 AM »
A technique ive not seen anyone else do is the canoe as your sled. I have done this many times. It permits taking along a lot of gear and if you have any thin ice suspicions just straddle the bow or stern till your convinced its safe.
  I would prefer to use my spud and check the ice, as I go out.  After a while you will be able to tell what kind of ice you are getting ready to walk onto, just by the sound of your spud hitting it.  If I have to rely on a canoe to save me, if I fall in, I'm not going!

Offline POk3s

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Re: ICE SAFETY - A CHILLING reminder
« Reply #4 on: Dec 22, 2021, 05:13 PM »
  I would prefer to use my spud and check the ice, as I go out.  After a while you will be able to tell what kind of ice you are getting ready to walk onto, just by the sound of your spud hitting it.  If I have to rely on a canoe to save me, if I fall in, I'm not going!

Haha I agree! I can usually just tell by the “feel”. I guess that’s both the sound and the “bounce” or non bounce of it when it hits the ice.
Trent Williams
When hell freezes over, I’ll ice fish there too!

 



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